Get Anywhere

WhichBudget.com is a searchable destination-by-destination database of 116 budget airlines serving 874 airports in 124 countries. Warning: this site may get you so excited you can’t sit still.

Want to find a cheap flight from, say, Vancouver to Hawaii in November? WhichBudget points you to WestJet, where you can do the round trip for about $500 before taxes. (Checking Travelocity, similar non-stops on the major airlines were already sold out for my randomly-chosen dates, although you could beat the fare if you were willing to route through Chicago.)

How about, I dunno, Los Angeles to Timbuktu? This took a little poking around and a bit of past experience, but in ten minutes I found connections on Point Afrique between the Malian city of Mopti and Paris, which you can skate to from Los Angeles via Ireland’s Aer Lingus. (Once in Mopti, most folks take the slow boat up the river to Timbuktu.) Total airfare, with a little planning: roughly $1500, round trip, before taxes. To Timbuktu.

My guess is you’re more likely to go to Hawaii. But just saying.

PS: if you’re concerned about the safety record of airlines you may not be familiar with — or, y’know, the whole zipping along seven miles up at 600 mph in a tin box thing anyway — AirSafe.com has the lowdown on whose tin boxes tend to go up and down as intended.

Get Anywhere

WhichBudget.com is a searchable destination-by-destination database of 116 budget airlines serving 874 airports in 124 countries. Warning: this site may get you so excited you can’t sit still.

Want to find a cheap flight from, say, Vancouver to Hawaii in November? WhichBudget points you to WestJet, where you can do the round trip for about $500 before taxes. (Checking Travelocity, similar non-stops on the major airlines were already sold out for my randomly-chosen dates, although you could beat the fare if you were willing to route through Chicago.)

How about, I dunno, Los Angeles to Timbuktu? This took a little poking around and a bit of past experience, but in ten minutes I found connections on Point Afrique between the Malian city of Mopti and Paris, which you can skate to from Los Angeles via Ireland’s Aer Lingus. (Once in Mopti, most folks take the slow boat up the river to Timbuktu.) Total airfare, with a little planning: roughly $1500, round trip, before taxes. To Timbuktu.

My guess is you’re more likely to go to Hawaii. But just saying.

PS: if you’re concerned about the safety record of airlines you may not be familiar with — or, y’know, the whole zipping along seven miles up at 600 mph in a tin box thing anyway — AirSafe.com has the lowdown on whose tin boxes tend to go up and down as intended.

Get Anywhere

WhichBudget.com is a searchable destination-by-destination database of 116 budget airlines serving 874 airports in 124 countries. Warning: this site may get you so excited you can’t sit still.

Want to find a cheap flight from, say, Vancouver to Hawaii in November? WhichBudget points you to WestJet, where you can do the round trip for about $500 before taxes. (Checking Travelocity, similar non-stops on the major airlines were already sold out for my randomly-chosen dates, although you could beat the fare if you were willing to route through Chicago.)

How about, I dunno, Los Angeles to Timbuktu? This took a little poking around and a bit of past experience, but in ten minutes I found connections on Point Afrique between the Malian city of Mopti and Paris, which you can skate to from Los Angeles via Ireland’s Aer Lingus. (Once in Mopti, most folks take the slow boat up the river to Timbuktu.) Total airfare, with a little planning: roughly $1500, round trip, before taxes. To Timbuktu.

My guess is you’re more likely to go to Hawaii. But just saying.

PS: if you’re concerned about the safety record of airlines you may not be familiar with — or, y’know, the whole zipping along seven miles up at 600 mph in a tin box thing anyway — AirSafe.com has the lowdown on whose tin boxes tend to go up and down as intended.

Get Anywhere

WhichBudget.com is a searchable destination-by-destination database of 116 budget airlines serving 874 airports in 124 countries. Warning: this site may get you so excited you can’t sit still.

Want to find a cheap flight from, say, Vancouver to Hawaii in November? WhichBudget points you to WestJet, where you can do the round trip for about $500 before taxes. (Checking Travelocity, similar non-stops on the major airlines were already sold out for my randomly-chosen dates, although you could beat the fare if you were willing to route through Chicago.)

How about, I dunno, Los Angeles to Timbuktu? This took a little poking around and a bit of past experience, but in ten minutes I found connections on Point Afrique between the Malian city of Mopti and Paris, which you can skate to from Los Angeles via Ireland’s Aer Lingus. (Once in Mopti, most folks take the slow boat up the river to Timbuktu.) Total airfare, with a little planning: roughly $1500, round trip, before taxes. To Timbuktu.

My guess is you’re more likely to go to Hawaii. But just saying.

PS: if you’re concerned about the safety record of airlines you may not be familiar with — or, y’know, the whole zipping along seven miles up at 600 mph in a tin box thing anyway — AirSafe.com has the lowdown on whose tin boxes tend to go up and down as intended.

Burma Cuts the Internet: How Will US Media Respond?

As you’ve probably heard, the Burmese dictatorship has begun cutting off communications, especially the internet, so they can go about their brutality with a minimum of fuss. It’s not at all unlike the film cliché of a home invader who cuts the phone lines before the mayhem starts. And btw, the fallen photographer at lower right in the photo below has died of his injuries.

Sample Image

The last few days have seen a decent amount of US media coverage of the growing mess. But there’s a media truism that "if it bleeds, it leads."

In other words, if a tightrope walker falls in Chicago, does it make the news? It kinda depends on the quality of the footage. If there’s none, it’s a small item on page 8A in the newspaper. If there’s cell-phone footage, it winds up on YouTube, and if somebody got it in HD, it’s on every cable news channel within 24 hours. And if he lands on Mike Ditka, it’s in the news and the sports.

I have no idea if Burma can really successfully cut off the outside world these days. Let’s hope not. But here’s the thing: if they do, I wonder how long the repression will remain on America’s radar screen. Will CNN and the like continue reporting on the issue, even without the frequent heroin-hits of fresh video violence?

I honestly don’t pretend to know the answer. But as long as we, the news consumers, are paying attention to Burma, we might as well notice just how and when the news producers care just as much.