One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.


One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.


One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.