Taking Another Lap

A happy development: looks like I’m going the long way around the planet again. A new writing gig (to be described when the time comes) means that I’m actually getting paid to go places I want to see. Pretty neat.

The details aren’t all worked out, but this one should involve between 12 and 15 countries, including lots of places I’ve wanted to see for years. (And yes, many of them I first learned about during the frenetic cramming-for-Jeopardy! period of my life described in Prisoner of Trebekistan.) I’m hoping to touch base with some friends I met last time around, too.

As always, I’ll share with the rest of the class — pics, stories, etc. — as time allows.

If this is your first visit, I hope you’ll pop back in sometimes when you get a sec. Thanks for visiting.

PS — the first time around, I stumbled across some guy giving Free Hugs in an outdoor shopping mall in Sydney. So I figured what the heck, gave him a good one, and moved on. Had no idea I was being filmed. The video came out about a year later, and sure enough, I can be spotted lumbering through at the 1:12 mark.

Hope the planet is just as benevolent this time, too.


Taking Another Lap

A happy development: looks like I’m going the long way around the planet again. A new writing gig (to be described when the time comes) means that I’m actually getting paid to go places I want to see. Pretty neat.

The details aren’t all worked out, but this one should involve between 12 and 15 countries, including lots of places I’ve wanted to see for years. (And yes, many of them I first learned about during the frenetic cramming-for-Jeopardy! period of my life described in Prisoner of Trebekistan.) I’m hoping to touch base with some friends I met last time around, too.

As always, I’ll share with the rest of the class — pics, stories, etc. — as time allows.

If this is your first visit, I hope you’ll pop back in sometimes when you get a sec. Thanks for visiting.

PS — the first time around, I stumbled across some guy giving Free Hugs in an outdoor shopping mall in Sydney. So I figured what the heck, gave him a good one, and moved on. Had no idea I was being filmed. The video came out about a year later, and sure enough, I can be spotted lumbering through at the 1:12 mark.

Hope the planet is just as benevolent this time, too.


One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.


One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.


One of the Most Beautiful Renditions of the National Anthem You May Ever Hear

There are a lot of reasons good people can feel frustrated with our country’s leadership and many of its major institutions right now.

But we should never lose sight of the fact that the vast majority of Americans themselves are (like people almost everywhere else) unbelievably good-hearted when given half a chance.

This happened a while back, but I just saw it this morning: the Boston Red Sox recently had a Disability Awareness day, and a young man with autism named Peter Rometti was chosen to sing the national anthem. Halfway through, he started to struggle, stammering and laughing nervously and losing some of the words.

Stick around through the awkward bit.  Watch how 38,000 total strangers responded.